A Shot in the Dark (1964)

STORY – 1
DIRECTOR – 1
ACTOR – 1
MUSIC – 0
CULT – 0

 

VERDICT – 3/5

 

 

PROS –
1) A bumbling, clumsy, and nincompoop French police officer investigating a murder case leading to hilarious situations.
2) Peter Sellers as Jacques Clouseau gave an excellent performance as expected.

 

 

CONS –
1) The comedy is often slapstick in nature.

 

 
QUOTE –
Clouseau: The murderer was after me. Fortunately, he missed.
Dreyfus: ‘Fortunately’ is not the word!

Without a Clue (1988)

STORY – 1
DIRECTOR – 1
ACTOR – 1
MUSIC – 0
CULT – 1

 

VERDICT – 4/5

 

 
PROS –
1) A comedic take on Sherlock Holmes universe where Dr. Watson is the real detective and Holmes is merely an actor playing the fictional creation of Dr. John Watson.
2) The comedy is slightly slapstick in nature but still hilarious. Michael Caine’s performance as the bumbling Sherlock Holmes is extremely amusing.
3) The witty dialogues keep the movie entertaining throughout.
4) While the movie is an out-and-out comedy, the case is not. It’s an equally gripping case of stolen printing plates for £5 banknotes.
5) Jeffrey Jones perfectly fits the bill to play Inspector Lestrade.

 

CONS –
N/A

 

QUOTE –
Watson: Holmes believes your father has been abducted.
Leslie: Abducted? By who?
Sherlock Holmes: Abductors

Charade (1963)

STORY – 1
DIRECTOR – 1
ACTOR – 1
MUSIC – 1
CULT – 1

 

VERDICT – 5/5

 

 
PROS –
1) Four retired US soldiers are in search of the $250,000 from the widow of their fifth partner who double-crossed them during the 2nd World War.
2) Multiple plot twists towards the end of the movie. The Walter Matthau twist blow the lid off audiences’ heads.
3) The movie is an out and out Hitchcockian mystery movie. However, at the same time, it appears like a Billy Wilder’s rom-com set in Paris with the presence of Cary Grant & Audrey Hepburn featuring Henry Mancini’s music.
4) “Charade (Main Title)” by Henry Mancini.

 

 

CONS –
N/A

 

 

QUOTE –
Alexander Dyle: There’s an old riddle about two tribes of Indians. The Whitefeet always tell the truth, and the Blackfeet always lie. So one day you meet an Indian. You say, “Hey, Indian, what are you, a truthful Whitefoot or a lying Blackfoot? He says, “I’m a truthful Whitefoot.” But which is he?

Wait Until Dark (1967)

STORY – 1
DIRECTOR – 1
ACTOR – 1
MUSIC – 1
CULT – 1

 

VERDICT – 5/5

 
PROS –
1) A Hitchcockian movie not directed by Alfred Hitchcock. It has all the elements of a stage play as seen in Dial M for Murder (1954), Rope (1948), and Rear Window (1954).
2) A blind woman turning the tables against her adversary by embracing her greatest shortcoming. Watching Audrey Hepburn playing the damsel in distress was a delight.
3) The cinematography without lights put the audiences right in the middle of the action.
4) Alan Arkin (with “Geraldine“) as a cold-blooded hitman giving Anton Chigurh a run for his money.
5) Presence of Julie Herrod as Gloria, the adventure-loving audacious girl next door gave a very Nancy Drew touch to the story.

 

CONS –
N/A

 
QUOTE –
Susy Hendrix: As soon as your safe, I’ll call the police.
Gloria: Okay. Gee, I wish something like this would happen every day…

Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1961)

STORY – 1
DIRECTOR – 1
ACTOR – 1
MUSIC – 1
CULT – 1

Verdict – 5/5

 

 

Pros –

 

1) Story of mentally disturbed, over-extrovert blatant gold-digger discovering true love.
2) It’s landmark movie for the character of Holly Golightly played by Audrey Hepburn, perhaps her best.
3) It’s a dark tragedy under the facade of a beautiful damsel, her social life and Henry Mancini’s music.
4) Analogy of the central character with the nameless cat.
5) Everything related Holly’s character is iconic for pop-culture.Her wild parties, her over-sized cigarette holder, her hats, her hair-styles, careless attitude, her sunglasses, all her dresses.

 
Cons –

 

 

1) Mickey Rooney as Mr. Yunioshi – not funny at all rather annoying.

 

 

Quote –

 

Holly Golightly: I’m like cat here, a no-name slob. We belong to nobody, and nobody belongs to us. We don’t even belong to each other.

The Party (1968)

STORY – 1
DIRECTOR – 0
ACTOR – 1
MUSIC – 0
CULT – 1

Verdict – 3/5

Pros –
1) 5 minutes into the movie and you won’t realize it’s a British actor playing an Indian. This Indian stereotype can be attributed to Peter Sellers’ excellent performance.

 

Cons –
1) A great concept but the legendary director was stick to his slapstick humor tactics not trusting Peter Sellers. The climactic pie-fight from “The Great Race” was replaced by soap-bubbles. But it won’t work every time
2) Lack of supporting cast.

 

Quote –
“Hrundi V. Bakshi: Birdie Num Num”